Elmer Wayne Henley

Elmer Wayne Henley later confessed to his role in procuring boys for Corll.

Elmer Wayne Henley later confessed to his role in procuring boys for Corll.

Elmer Wayne Henley, known as just Wayne by friends, had become acquainted with Corll in 1970 after being introduced to him through his school friend, David Owen Brooks. According to Henley’s confession, Brooks told Henley that he could get him a job making a decent amount of money through Corll. Henley had heard that Corll worked for an organized crime racket out of Dallas, specializing in the human trafficking of children, prostitution, and drug dealing. He was told by Corll that if he could find him a “good boy” he’d pay him a $200 finders fee, with the potential of more if he was particularly fond of the boy.

Henley did not immediately act upon Corll’s proposition, but it remained in the back of his mind. A year later Henley would return to Corll, now living in an apartment on Schuler Street in Houston, and told him that he would find him a boy in exchange for the $200 Corll had promised him in their prior discussion.

David Owen Brooks

David Brooks also admitted to helping Corll kidnap boys and assisting in hiding the boys' bodies.

David Owen Brooks also admitted to helping Corll kidnap boys and assisted in hiding the boys’ bodies.

Before becoming Corll’s accomplice, Brooks could often be found hanging around Corll’s candy shop. He liked Dean and enjoyed the perks of getting free candy. Corll would often take Brooks on trips to the beach, along with providing him money and a variety of gifts. Corll gradually convinced Brooks into developing a sexual relationship with him and would pay the teen in cash and gifts to allow him to perform oral sex on him. As Brooks spent more time with Corll, it wouldn’t be long before he stumbled upon his dark secret.

Brooks walked into Corll’s apartment as he had two boys chained up to his torture board. Rather than kill Brooks too, Corll paid Brooks to keep quiet and told him that the boys had been sent off to California. Later, Corll admitted to Brooks that he had killed the boys and offered Brooks the same deal he would later offer Henley. $200 per boy Brooks brought to him.

Brooks couldn’t resist the offer, but maintains that he never participated in any murders. His only involvement after coercing the boys to come to Corll’s place was to stand guard in case something happened and to assist Corll with disposing the bodies once he was finished.